August 27, 2017

Algorithms that Facebook's censors use to differentiate between hate speech and legitimate political expression.

The algorithms that Facebook's censors use to differentiate between hate speech and legitimate political expression.

Julia Angwin, ProPublica, and Hannes Grassegger, special to ProPublica, June 28, 2017,
deconstruct their own clickbait:


A trove of internal documents reviewed by ProPublica sheds new light on the secret guidelines that Facebook's censors use to distinguish between hate speech and legitimate political expression. The documents reveal the rationale behind seemingly inconsistent decisions. For instance, Higgins' incitement to violence passed muster because it targeted a specific sub-group of Muslims -- those that are "radicalized" -- while Delgado's post was deleted for attacking whites in general.


Hoffman said the team also relied on the principle of harm articulated by John Stuart Mill, a 19th-century English political philosopher. It states "that the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others." That led to the development of Facebook's "credible threat" standard, which bans posts that describe specific actions that could threaten others, but allows threats that are not likely to be carried out.

Eventually, however, Hoffman said "we found that limiting it to physical harm wasn't sufficient, so we started exploring how free expression societies deal with this."

Continue reading "Algorithms that Facebook's censors use to differentiate between hate speech and legitimate political expression." »

August 24, 2017

Jack Baruth handed you the truth, how did you handle it ? The truth about cars 2014/07/theres-no-pill-for-contextual-dysfunction/

Jack Baruth handed you the truth, how did you handle it ?

The truth about cars's theres-no-pill-for-contextual-dysfunction.

August 19, 2017

Modern digital marketing workplace: a daycare for hyperactive young adults

a daycare for hyperactive young adults. I was told to wait on a nearby bench, a bench with no back I might add. As I surveyed my surroundings, I noted, there was not one inch of private space. There were Ping-Pong tables, candy stations, a variety of snacks, organic coffees and green smoothies in mason jars. Young staffers whipped by, paddle in hand, ready for a quick game before their next meeting. Was it just me or were they actually wearing roller blades? I couldn't help but wonder when the workplace transitioned into a playground.

-- Vickie Fagan


August 18, 2017

Long tail media meeds programatic ad buying

Much online advertising capitalizes on the lure of the so-called long tail of the internet -- sites that draw relatively small but attractive audiences, like blogs for new parents or forums for truck enthusiasts. Advertising on those sites costs a fraction of what it does on more prominent online destinations, which typically deal directly with advertisers.

Teenagers overseas and entrepreneurs in the United States discovered this year that they could earn thousands of dollars a month by writing wholly fictionalized or wildly exaggerated partisan political news intended to be spread on Facebook. They then reaped money from Google Ads and other networks after credulous readers in the United States clicked through to their sites.

"A lot of ad buying systems are trying to show the right ad to the right person at the right time, and you see that mantra of those three variables across the industry," said Michael Tiffany, the chief executive and a founder of White Ops, an ad fraud detection company. "Note how 'on the right site' doesn't make the list."

Continue reading "Long tail media meeds programatic ad buying" »

August 16, 2017

GSEs took better care of foreclosed homes in working- and middle-class white areas than of equivalent homes in black and Latino communities ?


The mortgage crisis that ravaged the economy eight years ago was especially damaging to African-American communities, where homeowners who qualified for affordable mortgages were often steered into high-priced loans that paid rich returns to mortgage brokers and lenders while leaving borrowers vulnerable to default.

The ensuing glut of vacant homes drove down property values almost everywhere. But minority communities suffered disproportionately, widening the already considerable wealth gap between white and minority households.

One big reason for these disparities, according to a federal lawsuit filed by a coalition of fair housing groups, was that companies like the mortgage giant Fannie Mae took better care of foreclosed homes in working- and middle-class white areas than of equivalent homes in black and Latino communities. The plaintiffs, led by the National Fair Housing Alliance, say they reported this problem as early as 2009 and that they filed suit against Fannie Mae only after it continued to neglect foreclosed properties it owned in African-American and Latino neighborhoods.

Continue reading "GSEs took better care of foreclosed homes in working- and middle-class white areas than of equivalent homes in black and Latino communities ?" »

Tokimeku

Before you start deciding what sparks joy in your life, you must first get a true sense of the problems you face. For example, when organizing clothes, I ask that you take out all the clothes you own and gather them in one spot, so that you can visually comprehend how much you have.

What we don't often realize is that the furniture and closets in which we store our clothing have a remarkable way of concealing truths we would rather not see (a pilled sweater, for instance, that does not bring any joy). It's perfectly fine to take advantage of this masking effect on a small scale, but when the amount of things that you don't need continuously increases -- along with the time and space that you devote to accumulating those things -- you will find that it becomes harder to lie to yourself.

We also work in much the same way. We often hide our problems inside the closet of our hearts as if they never existed. Whenever my mind clouds over and I feel overwhelmed, I immediately take out a sketchbook. I write down all the emotions that I feel and the possible reasons behind them across a blank white page.

Continue reading "Tokimeku" »

August 14, 2017

Wither cap and trade to address greenhouse effect global warming climate change ?

The Republican Party's fast journey from debating how to combat human-caused climate change to arguing that it does not exist is a story of big political money, Democratic hubris in the Obama years and a partisan chasm that grew over nine years like a crack in the Antarctic shelf, favoring extreme positions and uncompromising rhetoric over cooperation and conciliation.

Until 2010, some Republicans ran ads in House and Senate races showing their support for green energy.

Mr. Trump appointed Mr. Ebell, the Competitive Enterprise Institute fellow who had worked for years to undermine the legitimacy of established climate science, to head the transition team at E.P.A. Mr. Ebell immediately began pushing for an agenda of gutting the Obama climate regulations and withdrawing from the Paris Agreement.

When it came time to translate Mr. Trump's campaign promises to coal country into policy, Mr. Murray and others helped choose the perfect candidate: Mr. Pruitt, the Oklahoma attorney general.

Most public opinion polls find that voters rank the environment last or nearly last among the issues that they vote on. And views are divided based on party affiliation. In 2001, 46 percent of Democrats said they worried "a great deal" about climate change, compared with 29 percent of Republicans, according to a Gallup tracking poll on the issue. This year, concern among Democrats has reached 66 percent. Among Republicans, it has fallen, to 18 percent.

Continue reading "Wither cap and trade to address greenhouse effect global warming climate change ?" »

August 13, 2017

Freeters, Solopreneurs: the new untouchables ?

"SOLOPRENEURS" NEED NOT APPLY

Ruettimann believes an economic downturn is overdue, which will flood the job market with legions of contract workers, freelancers, and so-called "solopreneurs" applying for corporate jobs with full-time benefits. Whether or not that proves true, Ruettimann says that in the recruitment world, "nobody really believes in the gig economy."

The prevailing attitude, she says, is that "if you're self-employed, it's because you can't get full-time work." So job seekers looking for traditional roles after years supporting themselves--particularly older ones--she says, "are facing serious ageism and bias in the workforce." Ruettimann's advice is twofold: "If you've been in this gig economy, get your references in order and make sure you're working for really awesome clients who can vouch for you, then think about turning those clients from customers into employers--like now."

Continue reading "Freeters, Solopreneurs: the new untouchables ?" »

August 12, 2017

Tensegrity

Tensegrity, tensional integrity or floating compression, is a structural principle based on the use of isolated components in compression inside a net of continuous tension, in such a way that the compressed members (usually bars or struts) do not touch each other and the prestressed tensioned members (usually cables or tendons) delineate the system spatially.

Tensegrity structures are structures based on the combination of a few simple design patterns:

l


  • Loading members only in pure compression or pure tension, meaning the structure will only fail if the cables yield or the rods buckle
  • Preload or tensional prestress, which allows cables to be rigid in tension

  • Mechanical stability, which allows the members to remain in tension/compression as stress on the structure increases.

Because of these patterns, no structural member experiences a bending moment. This can produce exceptionally rigid structures for their mass and for the cross section of the components.

Continue reading "Tensegrity" »

August 11, 2017

Warby Parker: return of mirrored sun glasses for 2017 ?

ormsby/crystal-aqua

haskell/crystal-silver

haskell/crystal-electric-blue

topper-16/crystal

More in eyes.

August 10, 2017

Back pain surgery, Subluxations

"The ambiguity inherent in diagnosing back pain makes it possible for surgeons to do practically anything they want."

-- Cathryn Jakobson Ramin, author of a new book, Crooked: Outwitting the Back Pain Industry and Getting on the Road to Recovery.

Crooked weaves together her compelling personal story and those of compatriots in back pain of all ages. It also follows the money, revealing the hidden motivations of many industry players: workers compensation insurance companies, pain management specialists, the drug companies that make narcotic painkillers, personal injury lawyers, spinal device makers, and spinal surgeons, especially the ones who advertise late at night, often touting their laser surgery. All appear to make a living by exploiting the "fix me" pleadings from people in pain.

This is not to suggest that all spine surgeons or specialists are villains, of course. Sometimes surgery is necessary, though many top spine specialists interviewed for Crooked agreed that surgery is overused. A spinal surgeon at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, Hyun Bae, explained why this might be, saying, "It's not only a financial conflict. It's an emotional conflict. We get paid to do the work. We want to make the patient better. So we concentrate on the good results and we dismiss the bad results."

Continue reading "Back pain surgery, Subluxations " »

Halifax celebrates biking trails

Halifax: Top-5-biking-trails- Halifax/.

August 9, 2017

27.5+ vs 29+ tire mountain bike tires

Trek suspension engineer, Ted Alsop, puts it this way, "27.5+, ideally, has the diameter of a 29×2.3 tire, but to get there, you have to give it a really tall sidewall. The bead-to-bead measurement-that's the actual width of the tire if you pressed it flat and measured from one bead to the other-is about 15 millimeters wider than a 29+ tire. Relative to the rim, the 27.5+ tire is actually taller than the 29+ tire, which is why we've found that the 27.5+ tires that we've ridden have a lot more of an un-damped, fatbike tire bounce to them and don't corner as well at lower pressures. The 29+ tire, which is actually a lower profile, shorter sidewall tire, has less of that uncontrolled bounce to it."

Continue reading "27.5+ vs 29+ tire mountain bike tires" »

August 8, 2017

To act now, visualize your future self

Help stop procrastination psychology.


We know from psychological research by Andrew Elliot and others that progress on our goals feeds our well-being.

Peter Gollwitzer and his colleagues for years have shown us that implementation intentions make a huge difference to even deal with things like distractions.

Robert Pozen, who's written a book on extreme productivity, has the OHIO rule: only handle it once.

Continue reading "To act now, visualize your future self " »

August 7, 2017

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs

Taking ibuprofen and related over-the-counter painkillers could have unintended and worrisome consequences for people who vigorously exercise. These popular medicines, known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, work by suppressing inflammation.

But according to two new studies, in the process they potentially may also overtax the kidneys during prolonged exercise and reduce muscles' ability to recover afterward.

Continue reading "Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs" »

August 6, 2017

Do biking commuters breath pollution ? A New York City story.

WNYC: Do biking commuters breath pollutionin NYC.

August 5, 2017

Art schools do not pay

The for-profit Art Institutes programs that failed the federal test trained students in fields including commercial photography, video production, radio broadcasting, culinary arts, interior decorating and video game design. Other programs that crop up frequently on the failing list include cosmetology and barbering, acupuncture and massage therapy, criminal justice studies and low-level jobs in health care fields.

What these programs have in common is a combination of marketing appeal to young people -- design video games for a living! -- and little or no outside pressure to ensure that the education is both of high quality and leads to jobs that pay enough to finance the cost of student loans. Sure, there are good programs in all of these fields, including some offered by for-profit schools. But it can be very hard for the average consumer to know the difference beforehand.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/13/upshot/harvard-too-obamas-final-push-to-catch-predatory-colleges-is-revealing.html

August 4, 2017

Immigration in America is more popular than immigration in Town, ST, America

Lefteris Jason Anastasopoulos, a lecturer and data science fellow at Berkeley's School of Information, provides one answer: Support for immigration "may be greatly overestimated."

In an email, Anastasopoulos writes that

polls conducted by large survey organizations never ask about immigration in geographic context. Instead they ask questions about whether respondents support increasing immigration or granting amnesty for undocumented immigrants in the "United States" overall rather than, say, Dayton, Ohio, or Wilmington, North Carolina, places where immigration has been rapidly increasing over the past few years. This kind of abstract framing tends to push respondents toward giving more "politically correct" answers to standard poll questions about immigration.

The result is

a significant underestimation of the backlash against newly arriving immigrants and an overestimation of the support for immigration among the public.

August 3, 2017

Green groups regularly parachute into her community, Gordon says -- West Oakland abuts a busy port and is rife with respiratory illnesses thanks to fumes from shipping, trucks servicing the area, and highway traffic -- but the partnerships aren't always fru

Green groups regularly parachute into her community, Gordon says -- West Oakland abuts a busy port and is rife with respiratory illnesses thanks to fumes from shipping, trucks servicing the area, and highway traffic -- but the partnerships aren't always fruitful. The outside organizations seem to have different goals.

Miscommunications often arise because green groups and their associates want to come in, collect data, and move on, she said, while her community members are looking for meaningful change. She points to a recent project where an environmental group, a major tech firm, and a research university mapped her neighborhood's air pollution block by block. The scientists got the data they wanted and released a highly publicized paper earlier this month. But the people of West Oakland didn't get what Gordon calls "liberation" from the pollution problems.

"After the community went through all the trials and tribulations with you, you should be supporting me to make local changes," she says. "You can't keep doing documentation without actualization."

Continue reading "Green groups regularly parachute into her community, Gordon says -- West Oakland abuts a busy port and is rife with respiratory illnesses thanks to fumes from shipping, trucks servicing the area, and highway traffic -- but the partnerships aren't always fru" »

August 2, 2017

Bo Stefan Eriksson, Carl Freer, and Gizmondo (not Gizmodo)

So while there was the illusion of fair exchange, there really was no exchange at all: Eriksson and Freer got diehard loyalty and free labor in exchange for Gizmondo stock, while their underlings were allowed to drive outrageous automobiles that they nonetheless didn't own. Models, supercars, diamond watches, paper stocks, parties: these were the currencies in Gizmondo nation, and everyone thought of themselves as fucking rich.

Continue reading "Bo Stefan Eriksson, Carl Freer, and Gizmondo (not Gizmodo)" »

August 1, 2017

Olga Cook story, west side highway tragedy


The husband of cyclist Olga Cook, who was killed by a drunk driver last June at the intersection of West and Chambers Streets, is suing the City of New York, the State of New York, the Hudson River Park Trust, and the Battery Park City Authority over her death.


Ms. Cook was run over at approximately 8:00 pm on the evening of June 11, 2016 when a white Ford truck, driven by a 26-year-old Samuel Silva, traveling southbound on West Street, made an abrupt right turn onto westbound Chambers Street, and struck Ms. Cook, who was riding north along the Hudson River Park Greenway.

Olga Cook,the 30-year-old newlywed and triathlete who was killed by a drunk driver while cycling in Battery Park City on June 11, 2016.

"There were 17 prior crashes at just this location, in the years preceding Olga's death," says attorney Daniel Flanzig, who is representing Ms. Cook's husband, Travis Maclean. "And five of those incidents also resulted in serious injuries. And there have been multiple deaths of cyclists at other locations in the Hudson River Park's bike path."


Continue reading "Olga Cook story, west side highway tragedy" »

July 31, 2017

McMansion is logical progression

Housing has always been governed by a simple rule: As people become richer, they spend more money on their homes.... Spending more money has usually meant making the home bigger.

This happened in Renaissance Italy, 17th-century Holland, and 19th-century England. It also happened in the prosperous second half of the 20th century in the United States.

Some statistics: In 1950 the median size of a new house was 800 square feet; by 1970 this had increased to 1,300; 20 years later it had grown to 1,900; and in 2003 it stood at 2,100. More than one-third of new houses built today exceed 2,400 square feet.

-- reason

Continue reading "McMansion is logical progression" »

Important type of insurance coverage that cyclists should have, besides their own health insurance, is the UM/UIM coverage on their automobile insurance policy.

The most important type of coverage that cyclists should have, besides their own health insurance, is the UM/UIM coverage on their automobile insurance policy. Yep, that's right, your auto policy provides protection for YOU in case you are hit by an uninsured or underinsured driver, including a hit and run driver.

This protection, called "UM/UIM" coverage, protects you if you are hit by another driver who is uninsured (that's the "UM" in the coverage). Your UM coverage also means you're covered in a hit and run. You're also covered if you're hit by an underinsured driver (that's the "UIM" in the coverage). This part of your policy covers you if the driver who hit you is insured, but for less than is necessary to cover payment for your injuries.

For example, in some states, "contact" may be required for your UM/UIM coverage to kick in. So if you were actually hit by the driver who left crossed you, your UM/UIM coverage can kick in as needed. If the driver caused you to crash without actually making contact, you're not going to be able to use your UM/UIM coverage. Again, this is not the law in every state, but it's something you should ask your insurance agent about.


Continue reading "Important type of insurance coverage that cyclists should have, besides their own health insurance, is the UM/UIM coverage on their automobile insurance policy." »

July 30, 2017

When it comes to new homes, bigger is again better. The median size of new homes built for sale peaked in 2007 at 2,295 square feet, then fell to 2,159 two years later, after the housing crisis hit.

When it comes to new homes, bigger is again better. The median size of new homes built for sale peaked in 2007 at 2,295 square feet, then fell to 2,159 two years later, after the housing crisis hit. But the appetite for ever-larger homes has returned: In 2012, new homes reached a new peak of 2,384 square feet and, according to the National Association of Home Builders, some 41 percent of new homes had four or more bedrooms, up from 34 percent in 2009.


"The housing market is being driven by the move-up buyer, the luxury buyer," said Brad Hunter, chief economist and director of consulting at Metrostudy. "And those who have strong incomes, secure jobs, their stock portfolio is doing well -- they are able to buy whatever they want. And what they are buying is larger houses."

Continue reading "When it comes to new homes, bigger is again better. The median size of new homes built for sale peaked in 2007 at 2,295 square feet, then fell to 2,159 two years later, after the housing crisis hit. " »

July 27, 2017

New urban Bronx

The development is being carved out of a 16-acre forest called Chapel Farms, whose past owners include the founders of the Theosophical Society.


bronx_07post_600.jpg

Fieldston, a neighborhood of majestic oaks and winding privately owned streets in the northwest Bronx, is prized for its quiet country-in-the-city atmosphere, as well as its early 20th-century architecture and proximity to prestigious public and private schools. In April 2006, Fieldston was designated a historic district by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

Mr. Moerdler of Community Board 8 said that complaints from Fieldston residents about the development had diminished. He said the opposition had its origins in concerns about a "deforestation program" of the property, which resulted in water runoff from the construction sites after heavy rains.

When asked to explain the difference between the houses of Villanova Heights and so-called McMansions, Mr. Stern said: "This is not a house for the Sopranos. These houses have fine detailing; they are based on creative interpretation of traditional designs."

He said that Villanova Heights was the kind of development that New Urbanists "would like to see happen around the country, where you have a relatively small property and the houses have a strong relationship to street, with clearly identified front doors."

He added that although the houses have three-car garages, they are "tucked around" toward the back of the house, and partially hidden from street view.

July 26, 2017

McMansion / Harvard Joint

People who are shopping for homes in a certain neighborhood expect certain amenities in those homes, says Kermit Baker, director of the remodeling futures program at Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies.

"If you're not keeping up with other homes in the neighborhood, you may have home buyers walk away from it. There's a limited number of folks who want to buy assuming they're going to have to do a significant remodeling project".

-- 2007

Continue reading "McMansion / Harvard Joint" »

July 25, 2017

I bought a house in humilty

I bought a house about two years ago. I got preapproved for a fixed rate loan and then found the home. My lender was absolutly amazed that I bought a home for significantly less than the amount for which I qualified. Said he's never seen that and that, in fact, people often come back needing the loan amount increased. McMansions are going up all around my pre-war bunglaow. I think Americans are crazy.

Hecate. (dead link http://www.haloscan.com/comments.php?user=atrios&comment=111253857282298328#2605269 ) Modern Pict | 04.03.2005

July 22, 2017

Republican are residual of income over education

Mr. Trump did extremely well among voters who lack formal educational credentials but work hard enough to make incomes above the national median. This column will leave it to readers to decide how much myth-busting the authors have achieved with this insight. But for those liberals who are eager to continue looking down on Mr. Trump's voters, this analysis would seem to be very helpful.

The deplorables tend to have fewer academic credentials, so the deplorers can tell themselves that Trump voters lacked the intellectual tools to appreciate the superiority of Hillary Clinton over Mr. Trump.

-- Nicholas Carnes and Noam Lupu

Archives